Sunday 4 'til 8

4:07 The Sunday Feature: The War That Changed The World - The Psychology of War

A panel considers the impact of the First World War from the viewpoint of some of the countries which fought - to provide a globalised history of the effect of World War One. One hundred years ago the First World War broke out. For the countries that took part nothing would be the same again. It triggered the collapse of three major empires, led to the Soviet Union, reshaped the Middle East, brought the USA into world affairs in a major way and changed the way people thought. The third debate of the series comes from The Imperial War Museum in London as we explore the psychology of war. What did the world's first industrial war do to the minds that fought it? And what can the horrors and the intimacies of that war teach us about the nature of the human mind? Historian and broadcaster Amanda Vickery is joined by a panel of experts and a live audience to explore the mental motivations and psychological impacts of fighting the First World War. Dan Todman and Michael Roper are joined by the celebrated cultural historian, Joanna Bourke, who presents her specially commissioned essay, Shell Shock and the Shock of Shells. How does a society recover from war and what difference does winning or losing make to a psychological recovery? (BBC)

See the BBC website for more information on this programme.

5:00 The World at 5

A roundup of today's news and sport.

5:12 Spiritual Outlook

Our regular catch up with the world of religion, spirituality, faith and ethics – produced and presented by Justin Gregory, Lisa Thompson, Amelia Nurse and Mike Gourley alternating with series from the BBC's World Service programme, Heart and Soul.

5:40 Te Waonui a Te Manu Korihi

Maori news and interviews from throughout the motu (RNZ)

6:06 Te Ahi Kaa

Exploring issues and events from a tangata whenua perspective (RNZ)

7:06 One In Five

The issues and experience of disability (RNZ)

7:35 Voices

A weekly programme that highlights Asians, Africans, indigenous Americans and more in New Zealand, aimed at promoting a greater understanding of our ethnic minority communities (RNZ)