15 Jul 2016

The longest and most exhaustive investigation in FBI history

From Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm, 1:26 pm on 15 July 2016
DB Cooper

DB Cooper Photo: wikipedia

The D.B. Cooper case has baffled the agency for 45 years, and now it may never be solved.

According to an FBI statement, the case began on the afternoon of November 24, 1971, when a man who went by the name D.B. Cooper used cash to buy a one-way ticket on Flight 305, from Portland to Seattle. During the flight, the man vanished into thin air, with a $200,000 cash ransom.

The aircraft was 10,000 feet above Washington State. The FBI believe he parachuted off the plane and is unlikely to have survived.

An animation of the 727's rear airstair, deploying in flight. The gravity-operated apparatus remained open until the aircraft landed

An animation of the 727's rear airstair, deploying in flight. The gravity-operated apparatus remained open until the aircraft landed Photo: wikipedia

Former news and public-relations man, turned filmmaker, Thomas J Colbert is calling for the FBI to re-open the NORJAK case, after spending five years investigating the possibility, that the skyjacker was a former Army paratrooper, named Robert W Rackstraw.

He explains why believes this to be the case.