Insight

  • Insight for 18 March 2012 ( 26′ 10″ )

    Lois Williams investigates efforts to preserve the water and wildlife in Northland's Wairua River.

Norhtland waterGroups worried about the state of New Zealand's rivers  are planning to set up a national network of Environmental River Patrols at a meeting in Wellington next weekend.

Insight investigates one of the drivers behind the move, the efforts to improve the health of a major Northland river, the Wairua.

 

 

(The meeting to set up the Environment River Patrol Aotearoa is being held in the Wellington Town Hall on Saturday 24th starting at 11a.m)

Coming Up on Insight

8:12 am Sunday 1 March: Maori Wards - Partnership or Separatism?

DSCKaumatua Rangikotuku Rukuwai (centre) blesses Hugh Johnson (left) and New Plymouth Mayor Andrew Judd following the handover of the petition. (Photo RNZ/Robin Martin)

When New Plymouth Mayor Andrew Judd pushed through an initiative for the city to introduce a designated seat for Maori at next year's local body elections he opened a veritable Pandora's Box.

Although some Maori celebrated on the night, opposition emerged just as quickly.

One councillor, John McLeod, quit on the spot and the then president of Greypower New Plymouth, Hugh Johnson, started a petition to force a binding referendum on the issue.

Radio New Zealand's Taranaki reporter, Robin Martin, has been talking to some of those affected by the decision and others who have decided to wade into the debate.

He looks at the implications of the Maori ward initiative and what it says about Maori representation in New Zealand 175 years after the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi.

8:12 am Sunday 8 March: Blurred Frontlines - The Changing Nature of Journalism

Mariupol UklraineKim Vinnell reporting during a shoot out in Mairupol, Ukraine (Photo:Kim Vinnell)

The images of Western journalists clad in orange jumpsuits being murdered by fighters claiming a holy war are difficult for the public to ignore. But for journalists, and especially those working in the Middle East, it means much more.

Being a war correspondent used to involve watching the front lines, and making calculations on risk versus reward. Now, the Middle East is fracturing before our eyes, and power vacuums are quickly filled with armed groups who are much harder to predict than armies.

Having covered conflicts both up close and from afar, reporter Kim Vinnell takes a look at how groups like Islamic State are changing the game for journalists.