Kiwi Summer

Friday 13 January 2012, with Sonia Sly & Lynn Freeman

Audio from Friday 13 January 2012

Not all audio is available due to copyright restrictions.

09:10 News and current affairs

lindauerhealth@xtra.co.nz

09:30 On the Radar - Scott Yorke

Scott Yorke blogs at www.imperatorfish.com

09:40 Your summer in exactly 10 words

Daily competition winners with their concise descriptions of how their summer has been, in exactly 10 words.

09:55 Are We There Yet? - Chew Chong, Taranaki entrepreneur

Our road trip around New Zealand with Roadside Stories from the Ministry of Culture & Heritage.

One of New Zealand's first dairy factories was opened near Eltham in 1887 by Chinese entrepreneur Chew Chong.

10:05 In Conversation with Catherine Smith

Cyclist Catherine Smith has a mission - to get more people on bikes and out of cars.

10:30 Chris Bourke’s Blue Smoke: Where the Kiwi Rhythm Calls (Part 1)

Original New Zealand songwriting in the late 1950s and early 1960s, in our history of NZ pop music.

10:55 Are We There Yet? - Sugar Loaf Islands, an ancient volcano

The Sugar Loaf Islands and Paritutū are the remnants of an enormous volcano - the oldest in Taranaki.

11:05 Summer Reading

We invite you to share with the country your most loved and thumbed book. Contact us on kiwisummer@radionz.co.nz

11:10 Spin Cycle - Unknown Mortal Orchestra

Unknown Mortal Orchestra was a one-man band that was perhaps more of an unknown quantity in that its creator had yet to find its members before the band shot to YouTube stardom. Ruban Nielson speaks candidly about the secrets to his Unknown success.

Unknown Mortal Orchestra

11:30 Try Something New - Toastmasters

Many people are terrified at the thought of speaking in public, but Toastmasters clubs give their members the opportunity to gain confidence and practice their public speaking skills. Lynn goes along to the Wellington Professional Toastmasters Club to find out more.

11:55 Are We There Yet? - Iconic Mt Taranaki

At the centre of Taranaki is the dramatic volcanic cone of Mt Taranaki, named Mt Egmont in 1770 by British explorer James Cook.