Nine To Noon

Thursday 2 October 2014, with Kathryn Ryan

Show notes

09:05 Lyttelton Port defends $200k pay rise for CEO

The Port of Lyttelton is defending the 200,000 dollar pay rise being paid to its Chief Executive in the face of criticism from the union representing workers. Lyttelton Port's annual report for the year to June 2014 was released yesterday, revealing chief executive Peter Davie's salary was up 18 per cent to $1.24 million. John Kerr is the South Island organiser for the Rail and Maritime Transport Union, which represents workers at Lyttelton Port. And Raf Manji is chairman of the Council's Finance Committee.

09:25 Suicidal people advised to call Police by health providers

Police say they're getting increasing numbers of calls about attempted suicide – 12,000 in 2013. They're working with the Health Ministry to try to work out why suicidal people are calling the Police, rather than mental health crisis services, or helplines. Agencies on the ground say it's no mystery: Police are more likely to be available – and some crisis services even recommend people at risk of suicide call the police, instead of an emergency mental health service. To find out more, Kathryn speaks to Assistant Police Commissioner, Dave Cliff; Leo McIntyre, the manager of Atareira, the Wellington branch of Supporting Families in Mental Illness New Zealand; and Judi Clements, the chief executive of the Mental Health Foundation.

09:45 UK Correspondent, Jon Dennis

Jon Dennis reports on Britain set to join military action in Iraq (again).

10:05 Former Crusaders and Wallabies coach, Robbie Deans

Robbie Deans is the former All Black player who coached Canterbury through the glory days of the early 1980s. He went on to become one of the most successful coaches of the Super 15 with the Crusaders, as well as an All Black coaching coordinator. He then took on his most controversial role of all – the first ever non-Australian to coach the Wallabies. His appointment to lead the Australian team was turbulent and difficult from the start. The team performed poorly, there were political and cultural challenges, and ultimately, Robbie Deans was dumped as coach – even before his contract was over. He’s now opening up for the first time about it all. He talks to Kathryn about his career, and future ambitions.

10:35 Book review: Richard Seddon: King of God's Own by Tom Brooking

Reviewed by Gyles Beckford, published by Penguin.

10:45 The Reading: 'My Brother's War' by David Hill

One brother has enlisted, the other is a conscientious objector. Both end up on the bloody battlefields of France (4 of 10, RNZ). Told by Simon Leary and Andrew Patterson.

11:05 New Technology commentator Erika Pearson

Erika Pearson discusses new technology.

11:25 Parenting: Psychologist Paul Jose on coping with emotions

Paul Jose is a Professor of psychology at Victoria University.  His areas of research include how children and adolescents cope with the problems in their lives. More recently, he's turned to issues of positive psychology and positive youth development.

11:45 TV Commentator Hayden Green

Hayden Green discusses smart TVs and closed captioning.

Audio

Audio from Thursday 2 October 2014

Not all audio is available due to copyright restrictions.

  • Lyttleton Port defends $200k pay rise for CEO ( 15′ 29″ )

    09:10 The Port of Lyttleton is defending the 200 thousand dollar pay rise being paid to its Chief Executive in the face of criticism from the union representing workers. Lyttelton Port's annual report for the year to June 2014 was released yesterday, revealing chief executive Peter Davie's salary was up 18 per cent to $1.24 million. John Kerr is the south island organiser for the Rail and Maritime Transport Union, which represents workers at Lyttleton Port.

  • Suicidal people advised to call Police by health providers ( 23′ 26″ )

    09:25 Police say they're getting increasing numbers of calls about attempted suicide - 12,000 in 2013. They're working with the Health Ministry to try to work out why suicidal people are calling the Police, rather than mental health crisis services, or helplines. Agencies on the ground say it's no mystery: Police are more likely to be available - and some crisis services even recommend people at risk of suicide call the police, instead of an emergency mental health service. To find out more, Kathryn speaks to Assistant Police Commissioner, Dave Cliff; Leo McIntyre, the manager of Atareira, the Wellington branch of Supporting Families in Mental Illness New Zealand; and Judi Clements, the chief executive of the Mental Health Foundation.

  • UK Correspondent Jon Dennis ( 12′ 9″ )

    09:47 Jon Dennis reports on Britain set to join military action in Iraq (again).

  • Former Crusaders and Wallabies coach, Robbie Deans ( 32′ 4″ )

    10:10 Robbie Deans is the former All Black player who coached Canterbury through the glory days of the early 1980s. He went on to become one of the most successful coaches of the Super 15 with the Crusaders, as well as an All Black coaching coordinator. He then took on his most controversial role of all - the first ever non-Australian to coach the Wallabies. His appointment to lead the Australian team was turbulent and difficult from the start. The team performed poorly, there were political and cultural challenges, and ultimately, Robbie Deans was dumped as coach - even before his contract was over. He's now opening up for the first time about it all. He talks to Kathryn about his career, and future ambitions.

  • Book review: Richard Seddon: King of God's Own by Tom Brooking ( 4′ 16″ )

    10:39 Reviewed by Gyles Beckford, published by Penguin.

  • New Technology commentator Erika Pearson ( 13′ 39″ )

    11:13 Erika Pearson discusses new technology.

  • Parenting: Psychologist Paul Jose on coping with emotions ( 23′ 31″ )

    11:27 Paul Jose is a Professor of psychology at Victoria University. His areas of research include how children and adolescents cope with the problems in their lives. More recently, he's turned to issues of positive psychology and positive youth development.

  • TV Commentator Hayden Green ( 8′ 46″ )

    11:51 Hayden Green discusses smart TVs and closed captioning.