Nine To Noon

Tuesday 24 May 2016, with Kathryn Ryan

Four deaths in four days on Mt Everest

9:07 AM.There have been four deaths in four days on Mt Everest as the first climbing season for two years draws to a close. Two more are feared dead. The world's highest peak has been closed to climbers for two years following last year's earthquake and a major ice fall the previous year. Many climbing parties are trying to get to the summit in a limited weather window, leading to bottlenecks high on the summit, and claims again that inexperienced climbers are holding up others. Kathryn speaks with Norbu Tenzing of the American Himalayan Foundation.

Regulations too strict say natural health businesses

9:17 AM.Small natural health businesses say new regulations which will regulate the natural health industry are heavy handed and will hurt them the most. The Natural Health and Supplementary Products bill will allow the Ministry of Health to regulate the sector, so ingredients in supplements are permitted or prohibited and manufacturers are licensed.It will also restrict the claims that can be made about products so potential health benefits could only be made if there is proven scientific evidence, or traditional evidence that it works. Dr Guy Hatchard represents a group of 10 Natural Health companies and practitioners who are worried about the changes. Kathryn also speaks with Alison Quesnell the executive director of Natural Products NZ.

The Auckland tech firm aiming to eliminate intravenous medication errors

9:51 AM.Veriphi is an Auckland based private health tech company which has developed a world-first technology to help eliminate intravenous medication errors in hospitals. Preventable medication errors are a challenge for hospitals around the world. Veriphi's Managing Director Greg Shanahan is also the editor of the annual TIN 100 report which each year tracks New Zealand's top performing technology firms. He talks to Kathryn about how the technology works, and why health tech is currently the fastest growing category within the tech sector.

US Correspondent, Susan Milligan

10:06 AM.The civil war raging within the Democratic party. For most of this election season, the divisions have been occurring among Republicans but now, the battle between Bernie Sanders and Hilary Clinton reaches a new level.

Andy Gourley: skateboarding accountant and founder of Red Frogs

10:19 AM.Red Frogs is an organisation devoted to reducing alcohol and drug harm in large gatherings of young people. It  began nearly 20 years ago, when Andy Gourley and a bunch of skateboard mates went to the Gold Coast during the infamous "Schoolies week. Surprised by the level of carnage with scores of heavily intoxicated young people, Andy Gourley began going around parties, offering red frog lollies, and helping drunk party-goers to walk home safely. Red Frogs now reaches 70,000 people in nine countres.

Book review - First Day of the Somme by Andrew MacDonald

10:40 AM.Reviewed by Harry Broad, published by HarperCollins NZ.

Business commentator Rod Oram

11:07 AM.Australia's competition watchdog is investigating Fonterra and other dairy companies over whether they failed to keep farmers adequately informed about milk prices, and what The Budget is likely to deliver.

Rewi Alley art collection goes online

11:22 AM.New Zealander Rewi Alley's extraordinary story of connection to China's communist leadership helped establish the most extensive collection of Chinese art in New Zealand. The writer, activist and social reformer was born in South Canterbury, but lived in China for 60 years from 1927 until his death in 1987. The collection of nearly 1400 Chinese artifacts is held at the Canterbury Museum. Dr Richard Bullen from the University of Canterbury and historian, Associate Professor James Beattie from Waikato University talk to Kathryn Ryan about a new website dedicated to the Rewi Alley collection.

Media commentator Gavin Ellis

11:44 AM.There are moves on the hyper-local news front with Fairfax New Zealand signalling changes to its delivery of community news, the NZME/Fairfax New Zealand merger is proceeding apace, and NZ on Air has produced some interesting research on women and gender in TV and digital production.

09:05 Four deaths in four days on Mt Everest

Climbers in the Khumbu icefall, Mt Everest, in 2012.

Climbers in the Khumbu icefall, Mt Everest, in 2012. Photo: AFP

There have been four deaths in four days on Mt Everest as the first climbing season for two years draws to a close. Two more are feared dead. The world's highest peak has been closed to climbers for two years following last year's earthquake and a major ice fall the previous year. Many climbing parties are trying to get to the summit in a limited weather window, leading to bottlenecks high on the summit, and claims again that inexperienced climbers are holding up others.  Kathryn speaks with Norbu Tenzing of the American Himalayan Foundation.

09:15  Are new regulations too tough on small natural health businesses?

Small natural health businesses say new regulations which will regulate the natural health industry are heavy handed and will hurt them the most. The Natural Health and Supplementary Products bill will allow the Ministry of Health to regulate the sector, so ingredients in supplements are permitted or prohibited and manufacturers are licensed.It will also restrict the claims that can be made about products so potential health benefits could only be made if there is proven scientific evidence, or traditional evidence that it works. Dr Guy Hatchard represents a group of 10 Natural Health companies and practitioners who are worried about the changes. Kathryn also speaks with Alison Quesnell the executive director of Natural Products NZ.

09:20 The Auckland tech firm aiming to eliminate intravenous medication errors

Greg Shanahan

Veriphi is an Auckland based private health tech company which has developed a world-first technology to help eliminate intravenous medication errors in hospitals. Preventable medication errors are a challenge for hospitals around the world. Veriphi's Managing Director Greg Shanahan is also the editor of the annual TIN 100 report which each year tracks New Zealand's top performing technology firms. He talks to Kathryn about how the technology works, and why health tech is currently the fastest growing category within the tech sector.

09:45 US Correspondent, Susan Milligan

The civil war raging within the Democratic party. For most of this election season, the divisions have been occurring among Republicans but now, the battle between Bernie Sanders and Hilary Clinton reaches a new level.

10:05 Andy Gourley: skateboarding accountant & founder of Red Frogs

Andy Gourley

Andy Gourley describes himself as a skateboarding accountant and youth worker, who's spent 20 years building an organisation devoted to reducing alcohol and drug harm in large gatherings of young people. Called Red Frogs, it all began nearly 20 years ago, when he and a bunch of skateboard mates went to the Gold Coast during the infamous "Schoolies" week. Surprised by the level of carnage with scores of heavily intoxicated young people, Andy Gourley began going around parties, offering red frog lollies, and helping drunk party-goers to walk home safely. Two decades later, Red Frogs is an international organisation, operating in 9 countries, reaching 70 thousand young people, with 1500 volunteers who dish out 20 tonnes of red frog lollies.

10:35 Book review - First Day of the Somme by Andrew MacDonald
reviewed by Harry Broad, published by HarperCollins NZ

10:45 The Reading

11:05 Business commentator Rod Oram

Australia's competition watchdog is investigating Fonterra and other dairy companies over whether they failed to keep farmers adequately informed about milk prices, and what The Budget is likely to deliver.

11:20 Rewi Alley art collection goes online

New Zealander Rewi Alley's extraordinary story of connection to China's communist leadership helped establish the most extensive collection of Chinese art in New Zealand. The writer, activist and social reformer was born in South Canterbury, but lived in China for 60 years from 1927 until his death in 1987. The collection of nearly 1400 Chinese artifacts is held at the Canterbury Museum. Dr Richard Bullen from the University of Canterbury and historian, Associate Professor James Beattie from Waikato University talk to Kathryn Ryan about a new website dedicated to the Rewi Alley collection.

11:45 Media commentator Gavin Ellis

There are  moves on the hyper-local news front with Fairfax New Zealand signalling changes to its delivery of community news, the NZME/Fairfax New Zealand merger is proceeding apace,  and NZ on Air has produced some interesting research on women and gender in TV and digital production.