Sunday Morning

Monday 26 December 2011, with Chris Laidlaw

The Best of Sunday Morning for 2011

Sunday is taking a break and will resume on 29 January, 2012.

You can listen again to some of our favourite interviews from 2011.

  • Christopher Ward - a titanic tale ( 31′ 46″ )

    'And the Band Played On' a book which chronicles the events leading to the sinking of the unsinkable ship a hundred years ago and the affects it had on the family of one of its victims; Christopher Ward's family.

    From Sunday Morning on 29 May 2011

  • Insight for 26 December 2011 ( 27′ 22″ )

    Nick Butcher investigates the use of foreign charter vessels in NZ's deep water fishery.

    From Sunday Morning on 26 Dec 2011

  • Mary Lovell - The Churchill Dynasty ( 37′ 29″ )

    Biographer and historian Mary S Lovell, famous for her account of the Mitford sisters, chronicles the life and times of a British political dynasty in her new book The Churchills.

    From Sunday Morning on 05 Jun 2011

  • Fred the Needle ( 31′ 42″ )

    Former All Black coach and captain, Sir Fred Allen at 91 is now New Zealand's oldest living man to have donned the black jersey. In his very self-effacing way he candidly talks to Chris about his incredible life both on and off the field.

    From Sunday Morning on 21 Aug 2011

  • John Farrell - Clarence Darrow ( 31′ 48″ )

    Clarence Darrow biorapher John Farrell.

    From Sunday Morning on 18 Sep 2011

  • Paul Gilding ( 34′ 37″ )

    Australian eco-activist on the need to act on the obvious when it comes to transforming the world economy.

    From Sunday Morning on 16 Oct 2011

  • Tevita Mara - Fiji ( 29′ 59″ )

    Self appointed democratic reformist and former coup strongman speaks about his beliefs for a way forward in Fiji.

    From Sunday Morning on 31 Jul 2011

  • Dennis Avery ( 19′ 29″ )

    The man who broke into Auschwitz; Dennis Avery tells his wartime story in his 95th year.

    From Sunday Morning on 10 Apr 2011

  • David Norton - Writing The King James Bible ( 19′ 11″ )

    It took more than a century to translate the King James version of the Bible from the original Hebrew and Greek. It was first published in 1611 and is still considered by many scholars to be the most influential and popular version of the Bible. Victoria University Professor of English David Norton tells Chris about how the King James Bible changed from being mocked as a piece of English writing to being valued as one of the greatest works of English literature.

    From Sunday Morning on 24 Apr 2011

  • Jane Bowron ( 21′ 10″ )

    Columnist on her observations on life in Christchurch after the September and February earthquakes.

    From Sunday Morning on 04 Sep 2011

  • Ray Columbus - Modfather ( 36′ 15″ )

    Chris talks to Kiwi prince of pop, Ray Columbus. Ray is about to release his tell-all biography, 'The Modfather - The Life and Times of a Rock 'n' Roll Pioneer'.

    From Sunday Morning on 26 Jun 2011

  • Bob Harvey - Surf Heroes ( 19′ 25″ )

    Bob Harvey has edited a book celebrating 100 years of Surf Life Saving New Zealand. He talks to former surf life saver Chris Laidlaw about the dramas and triumphs of those who volunteer their spare time to rescue others who get in trouble in the water.

    From Sunday Morning on 15 May 2011

  • Paul Street ( 19′ 7″ )

    American academic analyses the Tea Party phenomenon.

    From Sunday Morning on 16 Oct 2011

  • James Fergusson - Inside The Taliban ( 41′ 21″ )

    The taliban has become a label - a sort of terrorist talisman. But who, really, are the taliban? Why are they regarded with such revulsion outside Afghanistan, and what is their connection to Al Qaeda? British journalist James Fergusson is one of the few people to penetrate the inner sanctum of the Pashtun community, from which the taliban arose, and spoke to Chris about the taliban phenomenon.

    From Sunday Morning on 08 May 2011

  • Hemana Waaka - Broadcasting in Te Reo ( 15′ 2″ )

    Pioneering Maori broadcaster Hemana Waaka heads Maori TV's Te Reo World Cup commentary team. He talks to Chris about his career in broadcasting, writing the Maori sports dictionary, and how he is hanging up his boots to return to his whanau - and take a new career path - in Whakatane.

    From Sunday Morning on 23 Oct 2011

  • Fleur Sullivan - Life and Food, But Mostly Life ( 31′ 20″ )

    Pioneering restaurateur Fleur Sullivan changed the world of dining out for many when she opened Oliver's in Clyde in the 1970s, and now runs two restaurants in North Otago. She talks to Chris about her life - from marrying the least boring boy in Oamaru, her escape from domestic violence, to going it alone with three small children, surviving cancer, and catching fish.

    From Sunday Morning on 06 Nov 2011

  • Sam Zarifi - Justice in Sri Lanka ( 19′ 8″ )

    In the wake of reports of Tamil asylum seekers heading for New Zealand, Chris talks to Sam Zarifi, Amnesty International's Asia-Pacific Director, about the situation for Tamils in Sri Lanka following the end of the civil war two years ago.

    From Sunday Morning on 17 Jul 2011

  • Professor Richard Jackson ( 31′ 20″ )

    Professor Richard Jackson discusses the character of terrorism: its origins, its motivations and the curious ability of state terrorism to escape the full blaze of attention whilst non-state terrorists monopolise the landscape.

    From Sunday Morning on 11 Sep 2011

  • Simon Reid-Henry ( 16′ 31″ )

    Simon Reid-Henry is a British academic and writer. He takes us through the impact of the bizarre act of terrorism in Norway, in which a Norwegian citizen was able to gun down scores of his fellow Norwegians.

    From Sunday Morning on 11 Sep 2011

  • Ideas for 14 August 2011 ( 52′ 35″ )

    Bill Maung, who died on May 31, filled many roles in his 93 years of life. He was an active participant in Burma's struggle for independence, an inmate of a Japanese concentration camp, a judge, a governor of the International Labour Organisation, a member of James K Baxter's Jerusalem community and Black Power's political advisor. Ideas explores the life and ideas of Burma Bill.

    From Ideas on 14 Aug 2011

  • Ideas for 31 July 2011: Lord Robert Winston ( 55′ 5″ )

    Lord Robert Winston is back in the country as guest of the Cawthron Institute and patron of Sir Peter Gluckman's Liggins Institute. He's on a lecture tour and found time again to talk to the programme about a fascinating variety of topics.

    From Ideas on 31 Jul 2011

  • Ideas for 10 July 2011 - Homosexual Law Reform ( 52′ 1″ )

    It's 25 years since homosexuality became legal in New Zealand. Ideas talks to former Wellington Central MP Fran Wilde, whose private members' Homosexual Law Reform Bill finally changed the law in this country; Wellington counsellor and gay activist Bill Logan on the campaign for homosexual law reform and his life as an out gay man; and Phylesha Brown-Acton of the New Zealand AIDS Foundation about her work around the Pacific where homosexuality remains illegal in many countries.

    From Ideas on 10 Jul 2011

  • Ideas for 26 June 2011: Professor James Belich ( 49′ 31″ )

    Professor James Belich was known for his revisionist histories of the New Zealand wars and his two-volume history of New Zealand. But his 2011 work, Replenishing the Earth, took on a much larger canvas, which he subtitled: the settler revolution and the rise of the Anglo world. No doubt it was in large part due to that work that he was appointed the Beit Professor of Commonwealth, Imperial and Global history at Oxford University. Before he took up that position James Belich told Chris Laidlaw about his life, influences and what he hoped to achieve in the future. From the Ideas collection: Influential Kiwis talk about their Influences.

    From Ideas on 26 Jun 2011

  • Ideas for 29 May 2011 - Psychoanalysis ( 49′ 34″ )

    This week Ideas puts psychoanalysis on the couch.

    From Ideas on 29 May 2011

  • Ideas for 27 March 2011 ( 54′ 30″ )

    Professor Sir Peter Gluckman is New Zealand's first chief science advisor to the Prime Minister; the author of more than 500 scientific papers; and the only New Zealander to be elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science (USA) and the Academy of Medical Sciences of Great Britain. Sir Peter talks to Chris Laidlaw about the individuals, books and writers who have influenced him.

    From Ideas on 27 Mar 2011

  • Ideas: Fathers and (Disabled) Sons ( 53′ 41″ )

    Jeremy Rose reflects on his relationship with his youngest son, Tai, and talks to two other fathers of disabled sons.

    From Ideas on 06 Mar 2011

  • Ideas for 1 May 2011: The state of trade unions internationally ( 51′ 1″ )

    What is the state of unions internationally? Jeremy Rose has been talking to trade unionists in Bangladesh, the Middle East and China, to find out what's happening in those places.

    From Ideas on 01 May 2011

  • Ideas for 19 September 2011 ( 52′ 36″ )

    When it comes to recycling is New Zealand ahead of the pack?

    From Ideas on 18 Sep 2011

  • Ideas for 17 July 2011 - The Cost of Drugs ( 50′ 28″ )

    There are many life-saving medicines that cost just a few cents to manufacture but remain beyond the reach of most of the world's population. Ideas talks to philosopher Thomas Pogge about an idea he says could radically change all that. Dr David Hadorn, director of the Centre for Access and Prioritisation In Health at the Wellington School of Medicine talks about a proposal that he says has the potential to see New Zealanders at the front of the queue for innovative new drugs. And Otago University lecturer in health economics Des O'Dea discusses the pros and cons of the Pharmac model.

    From Ideas on 17 Jul 2011

  • Ideas for 19 June 2011: A New Economics ( 52′ 46″ )

    Ideas talks to three of the World Economics Association founding members: Ha Joon Chang, author of 23 Things They Don't Tell You About Capitalism; former World Bank economist and professor of economics at the London School of Economics, expatriate New Zealander Robert Wade; and Steve Keen, the author of Debunking Economics: The Naked Emperor of the Social Sciences.

    From Ideas on 19 Jun 2011