Te Ahi Kaa

Sunday 31 August 2014, with Maraea Rakuraku & Justine Murray

Sunday, 31 August 2014

Audio from Sunday 31 August 2014

Not all audio is available due to copyright restrictions.

  • Whakatāuaki mo 31 o Hereturikōkā (August) 2014 ( 1′ 15″ )

    18:06 Hoki atu ki o tātau iwi, hoki atu ki o tātau maunga, hoki atu ki o tātau marae. Engari kia mau ki tēnei kōrero - tu Māori mai, tu Māori mai, tu Māori mai Go back to our people, go back to our mountains, go back to our marae but cling to this command. Stand as Māori, stand as Māori, stand as Māori This whakatāuki was said by Sir James Henare (1911- 1989) to soldiers of the 28th Māori Battalion when they returned to Aotearoa after serving overseas during the Second World War Voiced and explained by Leanne Tamaki nō Tūhoe

  • Following in the steps of the 28 Māori Battalion ( 34′ 35″ )

    18:11 When your job involves caring for a website that memorialises the 28 Māori Battalion understandably your knowledge of military terminology and history is more than say, the average punter, Yet nothing beats the visceral knowledge gained when you actually return to the places where the soldiers fought and in some cases died. In May, Leanne Tamaki was part of a tour of largely C Company descendants who travelled to Tunisia, Italy and Greece and experienced first-hand how it must have been for the Māori men who were in the 28th Māori Battalion during the Second World War.

  • Karl Teariki ( 7′ 31″ )

    18:47 2014 is turning out to be quite a year for Karl Teariki whose album Te Manu has scored four nominations in the 2014 Waiata Māori Music Awards. It's made all the more special as it features two of his sons Tangaroa and Te Manea Teariki.

Hoki atu ki ō tātau iwi, hoki atu ki ō tātau maunga, hoki atu ki ō tātau marae.

Engari kia mau ki tēnei kōrero - tu Māori mai, tu Māori mai, tu Māori mai

Go back to our people, go back to our mountains, go back to our marae

but cling to this command. Stand as Māori, stand as Māori, stand as Māori

Sir James Henare (1911-1989) and explained by Leanne Tamaki

takrouna flag

Leanne Tamaki and Karina Ngaropo holding Te Mana Motuhake o Tuhoe flag with Takrouna behind.  In tribute, honouring Tūhoe men who fought and died here (May 2014) (Photo provided by Leanne Tamaki).

For Leanne Tamaki, adminsitrator of the 28th Māori Battalion website jetlag just wasn’t an option when she travelled as part of an 80 strong tour to Tunisia, Italy and Greece in May, 2014 following in the steps of the 28 Māori Battalion during the Second World War. In conversation with Maraea Rakuraku, Tamaki presents a few highlights from the trip that includes experiencing  the very places that hold the stories of Māori men. Such as Point 209, Tunisia where Te Moananuiakiwa Ngarimu (1918-1943) – the first Māori recipient of the Victoria Cross was killed; Takrouna,Tunisia where  Haane Manahi (1913-1986) displayed such an outsanding display of courage he was awarded a Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM) posthumously in 2007 and her koroua, Werewere Rakuraku (1923- 1943) – who was killed in action in Cassino, Italy.

It was a real whānau affair when Karl Teariki produced his latest album Pao with two of his sons, Te Manea and Tangaroa Teariki which was made all the more sweeter this week, with the nomination in four categories in the 2014 Waiata Māori Music Awards.

Waiata featured: Superman perfomed by Sons of Zion featuring Tomorrow People, Fighting for Freedom performed by House of Shem and Daydreamer performed by Tomorrow People. All finalists in the Best Māori Music Video category in the 2014 Waiata Māori Music Awards