This Way Up

Saturday 20 December 2014, with Simon Morton

NZ Radio Awards 2012 winner: Best Daily or Weekly Series (one hour or more duration)

This is our final show for this year. This Way Up will be back on air on Saturday 24 January 2015.

In the meantime, we've hand-picked some of our This Way Up highlights from 2014.

 

The store where everything is free

Free store

The Free Store is a project that seems to have found a radical solution to the problem of food waste; hungry people!

It's a non-profit organisation with a team of more than 100 volunteers collecting food from 30 cafes in Wellington, and then redistributing this to people in need from its home in a 20 foot shipping container.

From this one location, using food that would otherwise be destined for the bin, it's on track to hand out 65,000 food items to 12,000 people over the course of one year.

This Way Up's Simon Morton spoke to Benjamin Johnson at the Free Store and met the team of volunteers and cafes that makes it happen, as well some of the people using the service.


Tech: The Interview/undersea cables

Peter Griffin reviews the cyber attack on Sony Pictures that led to the cancellation of the film 'The Interview'. Also Spark, Vodafone and Telstra will fund another trans-Tasman undersea internet cable.


Tech: The Interview: undersea cables

Peter Griffin reviews the cyber attack on Sony Pictures that led to the cancellation of the film 'The Interview'. Also Spark, Vodafone and Telstra will fund another trans-Tasman undersea internet cable.


Information Doesn't Want to Be Free

Cory Doctorow

Cory Doctorow.

Photo: Jonathan Worth (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Copyright law has been around for centuries.

In his new book Information Doesn't Want to Be Free the writer and internet activist Cory Doctorow says that 500 years ago churches in Europe were arguing over who could copy the Bible, and how it could be used.

The debate over how much intellectual property protection the creators of original artistic works (including writing, paintings, films and video games) should enjoy is still raging today.

In his book, Mr Doctorow argues that modern copyright law and the distribution structure that has grown up to support it, is no longer fit for purpose in the digital age.

He claims that the routine use of copyright take down notices and so-called 'three strikes' legislation (denying internet access to users accused of alleged copyright infringement) can be used by businesses and governments to silence criticism, or suppress other material they might find embarrassing.

Meanwhile, it's not all doom for content creators. In an interview with This Way Up's Simon Morton, Mr Doctorow uses the example of musicians Amanda Palmer and Trent Reznor, the writer Hugh Howey and the American singer-songwriter Jonathan Coulton as people using the internet to gain and retain more control over their work.

Meanwhile, drawing on his own experiences as a popular writer and co-editor of the Boing Boing blog Mr Doctorow has the following advice.

"You should be crafting your strategy around the idea that your readers can and always will be able to choose whether or not they are going to pay for your works.So you should be figuring out how to ensure that the largest number of people who might pay read your books, as opposed to ensuring that everyone who reads your books pays you. I think that that's a losing proposition."

Listen to Simon Morton's interview with Cory Doctorow.


Cory Doctorow's Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age is published by McSweeney's.

The Spotted Shag

Spotted shag by Ben
Photo: Seabird NZ. (CC BY-NC-NZ 2.0)

On the hunt for the spotted shag with bird expert Hugh Robertson.


UK news: pay inequality

Tracy McVeigh on a proposed UK law to make big companies publish what they pay their male and female workers; a first step to abolishing gender pay inequality perhaps?


UK news: pay inequality

Tracy McVeigh on a proposed UK law to make big companies publish what they pay their male and female workers; a first step to abolishing gender pay inequality perhaps?


Professional cuddling

We speak to professional cuddler Samantha Hess. She's opened a cuddling shop in Portland in Oregon and is being deluged with enquiries


Tags:   cuddling

Quick hits
12:15   The Free Store
12:45   Tech: The Interview/undersea cables
13:10   Cory Doctorow
13:30   The Spotted Shag 
     
13:45   UK news: pay inequality
13:50   Professional cuddling  

The small print
First up this week
, we'll head to the Free Store. It's a food shop with no prices, where there really is such a thing as a free lunch.

Then at 12:45pm, Peter Griffin reviews the cyber-attack on Sony Pictures that forced the cancellation of 'The Interview'. Plus in local news, Spark's Lightbox joins forces with Coliseum Sports Media for a new video on demand service. Also Spark, Vodafone and Telstra will fund another trans-Tasman undersea internet cable.

After the 1pm news, the writer and internet activist Cory Doctorow wants to overhaul the world's copyright laws. He says they aren't fit for purpose in the digital age, and we're speaking to him about his new book 'Information Doesn't Want to be Free'.

At around 1:30pm we go hunting for the spotted shag with Hugh Robertson.

Then at 1:45pm, Tracy McVeigh on a proposed UK law to make big companies publish what they pay their male and female workers; a first step to abolishing gender pay inequality?

And before we go, we speak to professional cuddler, Samantha Hess. She's opened a cuddling shop in Portland in Oregon and is being deluged with enquiries.

We're playing these tracks too...
Artist: The Canyon Rays
Track: I Love You Still
Composer: The Canyon Rays  
Album: West Coast Babes
Label: Luke Hamel
Broadcast: 12:35

Artist: Casiokids
Track: Golden Years
Composer: Casiokids
Album: Aabenbaringen over aaskammen
Label: Polyvinyl
Broadcast: 12:55

Artist: Mato 
Track: Da Funk (Dub)
Composer: Mato
Album: Homework
Label: STIX 039
Broadcast: 13:40

And our theme music is:
Artist: Jefferson Belt
Track: The Green Termite
Composer: Jefferson Belt
Album: Table Manners
Label: Round Trip Mars