Waitangi Day

Thursday 6 February 2014, with Colin Peacock

Show notes

9:06am Mānuka Henare – Declaration of Independence

Mānuka Henare (Ngāpuhi, Te Aupōuri, Te Rarawa, Ngāti Kuri) discusses the 1835 Ngāpuhi-led Declaration of Independence (He Whakaputanga o te Rangatiratanga o Nu Tireni) – a declaration of sovereignty that underpins Ngāpuhi’s ongoing claim before the Waitangi Tribunal. Ngāpuhi stand firm on the argument that the Treaty of Waitangi did not revoke the declaration, but confirmed it.

Mānuka Henare is an expert witness before the Waitangi Tribunal Hearing Wai 1040 Paparahi o te Raki (Ngāpuhi-Northland Enquiry), and an Associate Professor of Maori Business Development at the University of Auckland Business School.

9:30 Tariana Turia – Walking in Two Worlds

Māori Party co-leader Tariana Turia (Ngāti Apa, Ngā Rauru, Tūwharetoa, Whanganui) talks about whānau poverty and the nature of inequality faced by Māori, the thinking behind Whānau Ora – and how we will know if it succeeds, and what she hopes to achieve for Māori before she quits parliament at this year’s general election.

10:06 Riki Ellison – Missile Defence

Riki Ellison (Taranaki, Ngai Tahu and Ngati Porou) left Christchurch as an eight-year-old to live in the US. He’s the only New Zealander to be part of a winning Super Bowl team; he won three times with the San Francisco 49ers. Today he is the founder and chairman of the Missile Defense Advocacy Alliance – a non-profit organisation advocating for hi-tech missile defence systems which he says will protect the national security of the US and its allies.

10:40 Paul Diamond – Cartoon Māori

Paul Diamond (Ngāti Hauā, Te Rarawa, and Ngāpuhi) is a writer, journalist, historian and broadcaster, who currently holds the position of curator, Māori, at the Turnbull Library. He has been looking at Māori depiction in cartoons as a window into race relations in New Zealand.

11:05 Reggae Kiwi-Style

February 6 is the birthday of the late great superstar of reggae, Bob Marley, making Waitangi Day the biggest day in the calendar for New Zealand reggae music. Every year the One Love festival draws some of the top bands and thousands of fans, and around the country many other reggae gigs are held on this day. We take a quick look at the connection between Waitangi Day and reggae that stretches from Bob Marley’s Auckland concert in 1979 to The Pā Boys – a film about a reggae band touring NZ, which opens in cinemas today.

11:15 James Frankham – The Big Issues

James Frankham is the editor of New Zealand Geographic, which is marking 25 years of publication with a series of major feature articles during 2014 on the big issues facing New Zealand’s land and people.

11:40 Ken Early – Sporting Agony

Ireland is an island nation of roughly four million, colonised by the British just like us. Do they embrace the same sports? Contest them with the same intensity? Agonise about defeat as deeply? And what does all that reveal about our respective national characters?

Ken Early is an Irish journalist and broadcaster. He talks to Colin about Ireland’s national sporting obsessions, the battle for loyalty between traditional Irish sports and colonial usurpers, and how an angry Irishman told the nation to stop being a bunch of losers.

Audio

Audio from Thursday 6 February 2014

Not all audio is available due to copyright restrictions.

  • Manuka Henare - Declaration of Independence ( 20′ 22″ )

    09:08 Manuka Henare (Ngapuhi, Te Aupouri, Te Rarawa, Ngati Kuri) discusses the 1835 Ngapuhi-led Declaration of Independence (He Whakaputanga o te Rangatiratanga o Nu Tireni) - a declaration of sovereignty that underpins Ngapuhi's ongoing claim before the Waitangi Tribunal. Ngapuhi stand firm on the argument that the Treaty of Waitangi did not revoke the declaration, but confirmed it. Manuka Henare is an expert witness before the Waitangi Tribunal Hearing Wai 1040 Paparahi o te Raki (Ngapuhi-Northland Enquiry), and an Associate Professor of Maori Business Development at the University of Auckland Business School.

  • Tariana Turia - Walking in Two Worlds ( 27′ 32″ )

    09:33 Maori Party co-leader Tariana Turia (Ngati Apa, Nga Rauru, Tuwharetoa, Whanganui) talks about whanau poverty and the nature of inequality faced by Maori, the thinking behind Whanau Ora - and how we will know if it succeeds, and what she hopes to achieve for Maori before she quits parliament at this year's general election.

  • Riki Ellison - Missile Defence ( 30′ 38″ )

    10:07 Riki Ellison (Taranaki, Ngai Tahu and Ngati Porou) left Christchurch as an eight-year-old to live in the US. He's the only New Zealander to be part of a winning Super Bowl team; he won three times with the San Francisco 49ers. Today he is the founder and chairman of the Missile Defense Advocacy Alliance - a non-profit organisation advocating for hi-tech missile defence systems which he says will protect the national security of the US and its allies.

  • Paul Diamond - Cartoon Maori ( 19′ 34″ )

    10:40 Paul Diamond (Ngati Haua, Te Rarawa, and Ngapuhi) is a writer, journalist, historian and broadcaster, who currently holds the position of curator, Maori, at the Turnbull Library. He has been looking at Maori depiction in cartoons as a window into race relations in New Zealand.

  • Reggae Kiwi-Style ( 16′ 38″ )

    11:05 February 6 is the birthday of the late great superstar of reggae, Bob Marley, making Waitangi Day the biggest day in the calendar for New Zealand reggae music. Every year the One Love festival draws some of the top bands and thousands of fans, and around the country many other reggae gigs are held on this day. We take a quick look at the connection between Waitangi Day and reggae that stretches from Bob Marley's Auckland concert in 1979 to The Pā Boys - a film about a reggae band touring NZ, which opens in cinemas today.

  • James Frankham - The Big Issues ( 19′ 07″ )

    11:17 James Frankham is the editor of New Zealand Geographic, which is marking 25 years of publication with a series of major feature articles during 2014 on the big issues facing New Zealand's land and people.

  • Ken Early - Sporting Agony ( 17′ 52″ )

    11:40 Ireland is an island nation of roughly four million, colonised by the British just like us. Do they embrace the same sports? Contest them with the same intensity? Agonise about defeat as deeply? And what does all that reveal about our respective national characters?