Windows On The World

Copyright restrictions prevent us from making these programmes available as audio on demand or podcasts.

Monday 2 May Mary Cavendish

Naomi Alderman tells the story of celebrity poet, playwright, author and thinker Mary Cavendish and finds out why she so fsascinated and yet also infuriated the men of the Restoration elite in the mid 16 hundreds. She was known as Mad Madge for her seemingly whacky theories.  Mary Cavendish was the first woman to meet the Fellows of the newly formed Royal Society whre she was greetedwith gritted teeth and fake smiles.

Tuesday 3 May Forgetting Igbo

Nkem Ifejika cant speak the language of his forefathers. Nkem is British of Nigerian descent and comes from one of Nigeria's biggest ethnic groups the Igbo. He's one of the millions of Nigerians, who live in the diaspora - almost two hundred thousand of them live in Britain.  From Nkem’s own London-based family - where his wife is teaching both him and their son to speak Igbo - to the ancestral villages of Anambra State, 'Forgetting Igbo' reveals shifting perspectives on Nigeria’s colonial past, emerging new ambitions for its future – and deep fault lines at the heart of its society.

Wednesday 4 May Selling Shakespeare

Shakespeare’s plays have been exported to almost every country there is. In Neuss, Germany, a replica of the Globe has stood since 1991. In Bollywood, Shakespeare’s stories have been retold since the dawn of Indian cinema, and become major money-spinners courtesy of movies such as Omkara (Othello) and Haider (Hamlet). In corporate America, his plays have been seized upon by executive training teams. And in China, Shakespeare’s works are being marketed to a new generation of domestic consumers, eager for a taste of historical culture. Author and critic Andrew Dickson goes on a globe-trotting journey to find out how the Bard is still very much in business – and discovers one of the most successful and flexible cultural brands there is.

Thursday 5 May The Forgotten Girls of Dhaka

Farhana Haider enters the world of Duaripara slum in Dhaka, Bangladesh to meet a group of teenage girls who were married and then abandoned by their husbands before they even reached the age of 16. While in the globalized world of opportunity, many of us are discovering and shaping our identities through new possibilities, others less fortunate are having their identities shaped by circumstances out of their control. Farhana hears some of the girls give intimate insights into who they are and what they think the future holds.