Windows On The World

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Monday 23 April: Two Views of Japan

The last twenty years in Japan look to have been abject grey economic failure. It seems that successive attempts to restart the economy have not worked. But if you look around Tokyo it’s a country that still appears very rich. So what is going on here? Peter Day attempts to find out by hearing two contrasting views of Japan.

Tuesday 24 April: Nigerian Crossroads (Part 1of 2)

Nigeria is at a crossroads. One way leads to chaos, the other to a decent, modern state. In a two part BBC documentary Mark Doyle investigates why Nigeria, with so much potential, is forever 'on the brink' internally. He asks can this huge, complicated country become the pioneer for Africa?

Wednesday 25 April: Paul Conroy - Photo Journalist

From Syria, to Sri Lanka, to Russia, there are journalists ready to put themselves in harm's way to shine a light on some of the darkest corners of conflict, crime and corruption. What makes them do it? And what difference do they make? Stephen Sackur speaks to British photo journalist Paul Conroy who was wounded in the Syrian army's bombardment of the city of Homs last February which killed his Sunday Times colleague Marie Colvin.  When, if ever, is telling the story worth risking your life?

Thursday 26 April: Bahrain Formula 1

Formula 1 is back in Bahrain despite the ongoing political instability in the country.Last year's race was cancelled following months of pro-democracy demonstrations where activists took to the streets to challenge the rule of King Hamad bin Isa al Khalifa. The government has admitted that mistakes were made in its handling of the unrest but says now it is time to move on and return to normality. One way to do that, it argues, is for people to unite around the prestige Formula 1 event. But as Bill Law reports there are many who believe that the government has not done nearly enough to address the grievances of the protestors.