23 Apr 2015

Supervisor not surprised by killings

4:29 pm on 23 April 2015

A woman who supervised visits between Edward Livingstone and his children has told their inquest she was not surprised to hear he had killed them.

Children's contact supervisor from Barnardos Rebecca Cadogan gave evidence that she oversaw five visits in 2013, at the inquest of Livingstone and his children Bradley, aged nine, and Ellen, aged six, who he shot at their Dunedin home in January last year.

Rebecca Cadogan from Barbados who supervised Livingstone visits with children.

Rebecca Cadogan from Barbados who supervised Livingstone visits with children. Photo: RNZ / Ian Telfer

Livingstone died in the house moments later from a shotgun wound, and the coroner said there was no evidence his death was not self-inflicted.

Ms Cadogan told the court today that during the visits Livingstone showed love and affection towards his children and they seemed to love him back though the visits made them anxious.

She said Livingstone was emotionally manipulating and seemed to have a narcissistic personality.

Ms Cadogan said when she heard on the radio about the shooting, even before she knew who had done it, her mind went straight to Livingstone.

She said that was her gut reaction because he was unpredictable.

Livingstone left note inquest told

Earlier the inquest heard that police evidence showed Edward Livingstone left a note the day he killed his children - and that there was a failure by health workers to gather key information about the risk he posed.

The note - as produced in police evidence during the inquest.

The note - as produced in police evidence during the inquest. Photo: SUPPLIED

The one-page note was found at Livingstone's flat in Argyll Street in Dunedin.

The text, signed by Livingstone and written in capital letters, said:

"Sorry

"Why couldn't Kath just let me see & spend time with my children?

"That's all I wanted, don't care about Kath's separation & the house.

"Just Bradley & Eleen!!

"I will be with them now!"

Failure of risk assessment

A clinical review of Livingstone's medical care, meanwhile, has found the system failed to gather key information about the risk he posed.

The evidence was presented today by senior consultant Dr David Chaplow, who convened a review of the case for the Southern District Health Board after the shooting.

Dr David Chaplow - speaking on the third day of the Livingstone inquest in Dunedin.

Dr David Chaplow - speaking on the third day of the Livingstone inquest in Dunedin. Photo: RNZ / Ian Telfer

Dr Chaplow told the coroner's court that, in general, Livingstone was given good clinical care by the emergency psychiatric service, DHB psychiatrists and mental health workers.

But he said, in a wider sense, there was a lack of information collation and a lack of integration when it came to planning Livingstone's care.

Dr Chaplow said Livingstone's wife Katharine Webb was never interviewed for her input, and key information such as his past arson and assault charges never came before his doctors.

Final written warning

Edward Livingstone

Edward Livingstone Photo: Supplied

The Corrections Department told the inquest that Livingstone was on his final warning at work.

Senior human resources adviser Mark Godwin told the coroner's court Livingstone had worked in an administrative role at the Otago prison near Milton since 2007.

Mr Godwin said Livingstone was suspended after he was arrested for twice breaching the family protection order for Ms Webb.

He said Livingstone was re-instated after the courts discharged him without conviction, but he was given a final written warning.

The inquest into the deaths of Livingstone and his children opened on Tuesday.

It was expected to take four days, with evidence from 18 witnesses.

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