5 Jun 2016

Pocket money 'pay gap' for kids

6:19 am on 5 June 2016

A survey of children's pocket money shows on average boys received 13 percent more than girls in the past year.

The British survey of 575 parents, conducted by the bank Halifax, showed they paid boys $14.46 a week, while girls were given $12.85.

The British survey showed boys were paid $14.46 a week in pocket money, while girls were given $12.85.

The British survey showed boys were paid $14.46 a week in pocket money, while girls were given $12.85. Photo: 123RF

It also showed boys aged between eight and 15 were more likely than girls to complain and think their parents should give them a rise.

The 13 percent difference was up from just 2 percent last year, Halifax said.

It was disappointing to see inequality enforced from such a young age, said a spokesperson for the Pay Equity Coalition, Angela McLeod.

She said parents should not assume boys should be doing jobs such as mowing the lawn, and girls, cleaning.

"The gender pay gap is a symptom of a problem - it's easy to measure and we do it every year," she said.

"It's hard to measure how primary children perceive jobs and which gender should be doing those jobs."

In August last year, a survey by Cartoon Network found boys in New Zealand were paid an average of $460 a year in pocket money compared to $396 for girls.