14 Jun 2015

Waves close road and partially flood tunnel

7:41 pm on 14 June 2015

Large swells, coinciding with a high tide, have washed rocks and debris onto the road on Wellington's South Coast.

The city council was warning people to stay away from the area this afternoon.

The city council was warning people to stay away from the area this afternoon. Photo: Scott George

The Wellington City Council said some of the waves had crossed the road and entered properties.

MetService forecaster Nick Zachar said the four metre waves were being generated by a low pressure system to the South East of the country.

"We do have southerly swells of three and a half metres in Cook Strait and maximum wave height of about five metres or so, so it is a downward trend from about now."

The tides washed up rocks near Wellington Airport.

The tides washed up rocks near Wellington Airport. Photo: Wellington City Council

The road between the eastern end of Lyall Bay to Moa Point Road is closed and the airport tunnel is partially flooded.

Front of house staff member at Maranui Cafe in Lyall Bay, Anna Brimer, said the waves had washed over the roads.

She said although the sea hit the building the cafe is in there had not been any damage.

The waves closed the road between the eastern end of Lyall Bay to Moa Point Road.

The waves closed the road between the eastern end of Lyall Bay to Moa Point Road. Photo: Stephen Lynch

Police said the swells were also affecting the Wairarapa coast and Cape Palliser road was closed.

Last month swells that were up to nine metres high off the Wellington coast forced the closure of Moa Point Road to the airport and Owhiro Bay Parade after sand, seaweed, driftwood and rocks were flung from the surf.

The road near Wellington airport.

The road near Wellington airport. Photo: Wellington City Council

A Lyall Bay carpark awash with sea water.

A Lyall Bay carpark awash with sea water. Photo: Twitter/ @lyallbaynz

big wave on south coast

Photo: Wellington City Council

Some took advantage of the big swell.

Some took advantage of the big swell. Photo: Stephen Lynch