2 Apr 2015

Haddin says he never intended to offend

11:59 am on 2 April 2015

Australian wicketkeeper Brad Haddin says he never intended to offend anyone when he told a radio station that the Black Caps deserved verbal abuse.

Brad Haddin celebrates a wicket against New Zealand in the World Cup final.

Brad Haddin celebrates a wicket against New Zealand in the World Cup final. Photo: Photosport

Haddin's sledging during Sunday's match was noticeably vicious, especially when New Zealand batsmen Martin Guptill and Grant Elliott were dismissed, and has provoked outrage from many in the media and New Zealand fans.

Haddin went on to tell a Sydney radio station the next morning the Black Caps deserved his verbal abuse following New Zealand's treatment of Australia earlier in the tournament.

"They were that nice to us in New Zealand [during their match in the pool stages] and we were that uncomfortable."

Haddin told cricket.com.au he was interviewed while he was still celebrating victory with his team-mates.

While he did not say he was sorry for sledging during the match, he said regretted the timing of the interview.

"In hindsight, we should have stayed off the radio," he told cricket.com.au. "If I offended anyone, it was never my intention."

Australia celebrate winning the ICC Cricket World Cup Final.

Australia celebrate winning the ICC Cricket World Cup Final. Photo: PHOTOSPORT

Earlier this week, the Black Caps played down suggestions that Australia was guilty of unsportsmanlike conduct during the match.

Coach Mike Hesson says his players took pride in their behaviour and New Zealand had to take its defeat on the chin.

"Different teams play the game different ways, we're pretty proud of the way we go about things," he says.

"Other teams do it slightly differently. But Australia were too good for us yesterday."

Elliott also said a verbal exchange was friendly just friendly banter.

"You know, what goes on the field, stays on the field. It's just good to hear how well the Aussies rated me as a player - but, no, it was just friendly banter out there."

Australian batsman Michael Clarke (R) shakes hands with New Zealand's captain Brendon McCullum.

Australian batsman Michael Clarke (R) shakes hands with New Zealand's captain Brendon McCullum. Photo: AFP

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