9 Feb 2016

Trans-Tasman cricket relations still cordial

7:13 pm on 9 February 2016

Trans-Tasman cricket relations remain cordial says Black Caps coach Mike Hesson despite the controversial dismissal of Australian batsman Mitchell Marsh in last night's Chappell-Hadlee series decider in Hamilton.

New Zealand won the game by 55 runs to enjoy a 2-1 series win.

There were heated words between the two sides when the Marsh was given out caught and bowled off his foot by the third umpire, after an initial low key appeal from bowler Matt Henry.

Black Caps allrounder Grant Elliott and Australian wicketkeeper Matthew Wade continued to exchange words for a couple of deliveries after the decision but Hesson said the matter hasn't affected off-field relations.

Matt Henry about to complete his controversial caught and bowled of Australian batsman Mitch Marsh.

Matt Henry about to complete his controversial caught and bowled of Australian batsman Mitch Marsh. Photo: Photosport

"It's always pretty good. With one and two (ranked sides) in the world there's always going to be a little bit of niggle as both teams are desperate to do well and I think that's just trans-Tasman rivalry isn't it?" said Hesson.

"The right decision was made in the end. There was a bit made that there was no appeal but clearly if you watch (the replay) four of our players appealed at the time.

"So we performed our task which is asking the question, sure there was a delay but I think in the end the right decision was made," he said.

The series win puts New Zealand at number two on the one day world rankings, behind world champions Australia and just ahead of India.

The Black Caps and coach Mike Hesson celebrate their Chappell-Hadlee series win.

The Black Caps and coach Mike Hesson celebrate their Chappell-Hadlee series win. Photo: Photosport

An unlikely victory

Meanwhile Black Caps allrounder Corey Anderson said they knew they were well under par when they headed into the sheds with just 246 to defend.

Anderson, who with an economy rate of 2.66, formed part of a much needed miserly bowling effort, said to restrict the Australians the way they did was quite special.

"To defend that total I think in the modern game of one day cricket is pretty spectacular to be honest. I know everyone stepped up when they needed to and I guess the games have ebbed and flowed and it could have gone either way again and luckily enough we came out on top," said Anderson.

With no-one standout player for New Zealand in the series Hesson said it highlighted an allround team effort.

"In any team you can't rely on one or two (players) and maybe in years gone by and in one or two sides around the world you do rely solely on one or two players and I don't think we do that. We've got a good group of players that anyone of them on a given day can turn a game."

The two sides now play a two test series the first of which starts in Wellington on Friday with the after affects of the one day series bound to add an extra bit of needle to proceedings.

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