Migrant workers recruited for non-existent CNMI jobs

6:10 pm on 29 December 2016

Three migrant workers in the Nothern Marianas say they have been victimised by a so-called broker of a construction company who recruited them for non-existent jobs on Saipan.

Silhouette of a construction worker

Three migrant workers who say they were lied to about jobs in CNMI say there are about 300 others who arrived under the false promise of work. Photo: 123RF

Anisur Rahman, Muhammad Anowar and a man identifying himself only as Hanif through a translator told the Marianas Variety they arrived from Bangladesh on 19th of June.

They said Mukter Hossain, a carpenter with Misamis Construction, arranged for their travel and job placements on island but once the trio arrived they discovered there was no employment for them.

Twenty-two-year-old Hanif told the Variety that his father sold their land and borrowed money to raise the $US12,500 they gave to Hossain.

Anisur Rahman said he borrowed $US15,000 from a bank while Muhammad Anowar said he borrowed $US13,750 with land as collateral.

They said Hossain has since left Saipan with no indication that he intended to return and he had also arranged the travel to Saipan of five other Bangladeshis who were soon to arrive from Dhaka, Bangladesh.

They believe that there are about 300 other Bangladeshi workers who have arrived in Saipan only to learn that there are no jobs waiting for them.

The group told the Variety they are asking Hossain for a refund and cannot go home because they don't have money to pay their debts and are now dependent on charitable organisations for food

All of them said they have CW1 permits approved by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services but it is hard for them to look for other jobs because they cannot speak English.

The men were supposed to work for Misamis Construction as building maintenance personnel and said they have been advised by Karidat Social Services to get a lawyer to help them with their case.

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