14 Mar 2017

Removal of West Papuan mural 'clandestine'

11:52 am on 14 March 2017

An Aboriginal elder and artist says she's upset a mural she created in support of West Papua has been destroyed but it won't stop her, or her community, from advocating for the region's independence cause.

Artwork by June Mills supporting the plight of West Papuans.

Artwork by June Mills supporting the plight of West Papuans. Photo: June Mills

The art work, which was painted onto a wall in Darwin in 2015 and represents the solidarity between indigenous Australians and West Papuan people, was painted over on Sunday.

June Mills said it was not clear who was responsible for removing the mural and she's surprised by the clandestine approach.

June Mills surrounded by supporters in front of her mural that was later painted over.

June Mills surrounded by supporters in front of her mural that was later painted over. Photo: June Mills

She said she was very worried about the volatile situation in West Papua and she intends to create more murals, despite the setback.

"There's incredible violence going on as we speak. Until that is resolved, we are not going to stop bringing this to the attention of the world community...whether that's posters, whether that's murals, whether that's talks, whether that's forums, we are going to continue."

"The mural was well-loved in the Darwin community," she said.

West Papuan Friendship Mural in Darwin, Australia, being painted over.

West Papuan Friendship Mural in Darwin, Australia, being painted over. Photo: Free West Papua Campaign

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