Jesse Mulligan, 1–4pm for Thursday 28 August 2014


1:10   Best Song Ever Written - 'A Banda' by Chico Buarque, chosen by Rui Mendel of Rotorua.

1:20  Our New Zealand A to Z takes us to the Wairarapa town, and home of the Daffodil Festival to signal the start of spring.

2:10  Cold Case - Scott Bainbridge:  Tomorrow in Hamilton a coronial inquest will be held into one of this country's oldest cold cases. 49 years ago, a young baker called Graeme Timlin disappeared from work in Hamilton. He was 19-years-old at the time. Five days later, his van was found at Mount Maunganui. No trace of him was found. That was May of 1965. There was a coronial inquest in 1977, which ruled he was presumed dead, but no death certificate was issued. Author Scott Bainbridge investigated Graeme's disappearance for his 2008 book, Still Missing. He said then it was the most mysterious case he'd looked into. Scott will be attend tomorrow's hearing.
 
2:20 Emily's Story - Emily Short: In June, we spoke with a young woman who survived a head on crash with a drunk driver at Lewis Pass. Her name was Emily Short. She was 11 weeks pregnant at the time, and said her unborn baby was desperately lucky to survive the crash. 20-year-old Emily herself was badly injured. Her femur snapped, her wrist broke, and he had fractures to her eye socket, cheek, and neck... and a deep knee laceration. The man who hit her car was Colin George Martin. He admitted to the charges of dangerous driving causing injury and driving with an excess breath alcohol level. And was yesterday sentenced to five months of home detention and was disqualified from driving for 12 months. At the time, Emily said she had sympathy for Colin Martin, and wanted to meet him.
 
2:30  NZ Reading: In our novel, 'Tuvalu'  things seem to be going downhill  for Noah.  His girlfriend, Tilly, has given him his marching orders after finding him with Mami,    His aimlessness is becoming difficult to distinguish from depression, and today's episode of our serialised reading  finds him fired from his job.
INTERACTIVE:      
BOOK: Tuvalu by Andrew O'Connor  Pub: Allen and Unwin ISBN -1741148715

2:45  Feature Album - Never Too Much - Luther Vandross (1981)

3:10  Homeless Football - Malcolm Brabant from BBC Health Check.
Danish Scientists are calling on authorities around the world  to find ways to help homeless people play football for the sake of their health and wellbeing. Studies carried out with homeless people at Copenhagen University show that playing football for 3 months significantly boosted balance, muscle strength and aerobic fitness as well as reducing levels of cholesterol and body fat. That may not be news to some of us but Denmark is regarded as something of a pioneer in this field with fifteen per-cent of homeless people now playing the game. Malcolm Brabant discovered in the Danish Capital, it even makes them live longer.

3:20 Ultrasound Device To Help Blind Navigate - Ruth Beran: A device has been developed in Auckland which allows users to illuminate their environment like a torch, but instead of using light, it uses sound, allowing visually-impaired people to navigate. Ruth Beran meets the Auckland-based inventors Claire Davies, and Shane Pinder, who show her how it works.
INTERACTIVE DETAILS:
http://www.radionz.co.nz/ourchangingworld

3.30  Bionic Heart - ex BBC Witness: Twenty years ago doctors in the UK fitted a patient with the first permanent battery-operated heart.
LINKS
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0251y1n

3:45  Panel Pre-Show - What the world's talking about today; Julie Moffett. Just as we moved on from the plight of the Yazidi people on that mountain, we find a number of them haven't been able to move on at all. They're still trapped on Mt Sinjar. What happened to Tony Soprano in that last episode. His creator reveals all. Or reveals the most important thing. They probably won't be banning Uzis in America in the hands of 9-year-olds, but we can tell you what they do ban. The glow that vegetables give you, MSG is rehabilitated, and why the states of Kansas and Arkansas are said differently.