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Summer Times

Emile Donovan and Lynn Freeman host a crowd of characters, stories and music makers for a summer holiday romp.

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Iceland

17 Jan 2019

We've been travelling around the country over the past three weeks on Summertimes, today though we're in Iceland. This chilly part of the world is a super hot tourist destination these days. Audio, Gallery

Friday 18 January 2019

Available Audio (12)

 

9:05 Conscious consumption 

On summer times over the past four weeks we've talked a lot about sustainability and consumer awareness.

And what we've found through talking to interviewees and your feedback, is that there is a lot of confusion that comes from the release of conflicting research and data.

One of the stories we ran about sustainability on the show related to fishing and there was a lot of feedback expressing very different opinions. So we return to that topic on the last show of the series.  

Fisheries is a fraught area. There are conflicts between commercial and recreational fishers, between fishers and conservationists. Because as consumers, there's also due diligence on our part - This morning we offer two perspectives on the sustainability of commercial fishing.

In a moment you'll hear from Dr Jeremy Helson, chief executive of Fisheries Inshore New Zealand and formerly head of deepwater fisheries in the Ministry for Primary Industries. First we hear from Dr Matt Dunn, principal scientist - fisheries at NIWA. 

NIWA's WRIBO harbour buoy transmits real time information about sea conditions such as temperature, salinity and wave heights.

NIWA's WRIBO harbour buoy transmits real time information about sea conditions such as temperature, salinity and wave heights. Photo: Stuart Mackay / NIWA

9:20 Jock Phillips 

Just before starting this summer show we found out about a project by the historian and writer Jock Phillips. He's writing a book about the social history of New Zealand, embodied in 100 objects. We thought it'd be interesting to get our listeners' thoughts on what some of them could be, so we put out the call and the response was overwhelming.

Over the past few weeks hundreds of listeners have gotten in touch with suggestions ranging from the Treaty of Waitangi, to the Swanndri jacket, to wood burners, cream cans, bicycles, diaries and dog biscuits!

Jock Phillips joins us to discuss the list. 

The flagstaff marks the spot where the Treaty of Waitangi was first signed on 6 February 1840.

The flagstaff marks the spot where the Treaty of Waitangi was first signed on 6 February 1840. Photo: RNZ / Claire Eastham-Farrelly

9:30 Westport in 2019 

It's our final regional cross today and we're heading all the way to the West Coast of the South Island to talk to Lee Scanlon. Lee's the long-serving chief reporter at the Westport News.

An aerial view of Gentle Annie Seaside Accommodation and Camping Ground near Westport.

An aerial view of Gentle Annie Seaside Accommodation and Camping Ground near Westport. Photo: Supplied

9:45 FENZ in Bay of Plenty 

We're checking in on the fire and emergency situation around the country over the holiday period a final time today with FENZ Bay of Plenty Coast Area Commander Murray Binning.

The Western Bay of Plenty town of Katikati is just two and a half hours drive from Auckland - but here $650,000 can buy you a four bedroom home with a garden.

The Western Bay of Plenty town of Katikati is just two and a half hours drive from Auckland - but here $650,000 can buy you a four bedroom home with a garden. Photo: 123RF

10:05 Dan Slevin 

Film critic Dan Slevin's here to tell us about two films today; The Kid Who Would be King and Cold War.

Cinema seating

Cinema seating Photo: (Photo by Felix Mooneeram on Unsplash)

10:15 Sarah Rusholme 

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Photo: Supplied

Playtime for children, it's often all so very structured these days, around extra curriciular activities, screen time and parent's obligations.

Toys for babies these days are also often high tech - from baby computers to self rockers that play music to toys and books programmed to speak a child's name. 

It's not bad - but what about super low tech time where a child's imagination has to work much harder. It's something that our next guest, Dr Sarah Rusholme, thinks about a lot. She's the Director of Children and Young People at Capital E,  Wellington's centre for children's creativity.

10:30 Auckland Folk Festival 

The Auckland Folk Festival starts next Friday and runs over 4 days of folky goodness! We're joined by the Programme Director of the Auckland Folk Festival Finn McLennan-Elliot now talk about the festival and give us some folky teasers.

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Photo: Supplied

10:45 Gliding away

Over the past three weeks we've spoken to volunteers from around the country involved in all kinds of organisations, from op shops and Red Cross to girl guides and  - today - gliding.

Jason Donovan, is a dedicated member of the Kapiti Gliding Club...that's now based in the Wairarapa. He's also a gifted athlete who's represented New Zealand in skiing and golfing  - in 2017 he won silver medal at the Special Olympics World Winter Games in Austria.

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Photo: Supplied

11:05 Rotorua Noir

Ninety-one years ago the writer SS Van Dine published 20 rules for aspiring detective writers. No love interests, for example. No wilful tricks or deceptions to be played on the reader. 

There simply must be a corpse, apparently, the deader the corpse the better, and for the love of all that is holy and good, the detective must NOT solve the crime by deducing that the butt of a cigarette left at the scene is the same brand as that smoked by the murderer. 

New Zealand has its own rich history of crime writers - Ngaio Marsh, of course, Paul Cleave, Vanda Symon ... but we want more! So local crime writing critic Craig Sisterson and crime author Grant Nicol have created a new literary festival aimed at doing just that.

It's called Rotorua Noir, and it's taking place in Rotorua's Shambles Theatre next Saturday and Sunday.

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Photo: supplied

11:20 Moa bone trade 

The Guardian newspaper's been reporting that archaeologists are asking the New Zealand government to stop the trade in moa bones. In November a private collector in Britain purchased an entire moa skeleton for $34,000 in West Sussex. Dr Matt Schmidt is the Area Archaeologist Otago Southland for Heritage New Zealand.

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Photo: Supplied

11:30 George Hobson 

The last of the youth leaders we're talking to on Summertimes is teenage conservationist George Hobson. He's just 15 but the home schooled animal lover has already been invited to help out with numerous wildlife projects around the country.

George is Forest and Bird's youth co-ordinator won one of the organisation's top awards last year.  He's also a Youth Ambassador for the Zealandia Ecosanctuary in Wellington and keen wildlife photographer.

11:45 Doubtful Sounds

Wellington based choir Doubtful Sounds and string quartet Strung Out play out our final show in the Wellington Studio. 

The Doubtful Sounds

The Doubtful Sounds Photo: Facebook / The Doubtful Sounds