Mediawatch

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Affection for elephants obscures important issues

Anjalee the elephant has been a huge hit since arriving at Auckland Zoo recently. A celebration of her birthday was widely covered this past week in the media, but the same can't be said of controversial issues which arose after the plan to import elephants and breed a herd here was first proposed.

From Mediawatch on 30 Aug 2015

Police shooting animals sparks outrage - and amusement

A runaway cow killed by police in Whanganui became a national news story this week when the shooting was captured on camera. It horrified some people, and amused others. But with cameras almost everywhere these days, police putting down out-of-place animals is almost certain to make the news.

From Mediawatch on 30 Aug 2015

Is The Daily Show's 'fake news' legitimate journalism?

Satirical 'fake news' TV shows have made a mark on US politics and culture, and around the world imitators are using them as a template. Are they just a bit of fun for fans of the genre? Or are they now a viable form of political journalism? Mediawatch asks a local expert who's looked into that, and also knows what it's like to suffer a backlash for criticising big names in politics.

From Mediawatch on 30 Aug 2015

Mediawatch for 30 August 2015

Affection for elephants obscures important issues; police shooting animals sparks outrage - and amusement; are 'fake news' programmes like The Daily Show just fun or legitimate political journalism?; the paper that sold its own town to prove it exists.

From Mediawatch on 30 Aug 2015

The paper that sold its own town to prove it exists

Last week, the local paper in Whitianga sold the town on Trade Me for $32 to draw attention to the fact that people there can’t list it as home when buying and selling on the site. A campaign in The Mercury Bay Informer prompted the online auction company to act, showing the power of a proper local paper going into bat for it readers. 

From Mediawatch on 30 Aug 2015

Claims and counter-claims of bias, cheek-by-jowl

Opinions are like backsides, as the old saying goes. Everyone's got one. But in the media, some are aired more often than others. (Opinions, that is . . . ) Winston Peters sparked debate this week by calling Mike Hosking a "National Party stooge, a claim the broadcaster denied. But the row has highlighted how opinion is more embedded than ever in our news media today.

From Mediawatch on 23 Aug 2015

Using news to help hype radio shows

Wondering why stories about radio stars splitting up, staying up all night or handing out money are suddenly all over your news? It's "survey time" again. Radio stations are desperate to boost their ratings and their owners shamelessly use news outlets to lend a hand.

From Mediawatch on 23 Aug 2015

News you can use going hyperlocal

Eight years ago, a dairy coolstore exploded in Tamahere near Hamilton - one of New Zealand's worst-ever industrial accidents at the time. Freelance journalist Pip Stevenson started an online news service which has covered the fallout in great detail. 'Tamahere Forum' is now the main source of news for a small New Zealand community which, like many others, is largely overlooked by our mainstream news media. Next week, it's up the Best Community Website prize at the Australia New Zealand Internet Awards along with two other local New Zealand news sites Mediawatch talks to Pip Stevenson about 'Tamahere Forum' and the prospects for 'hyperlocal' news online in New Zealand.

From Mediawatch on 23 Aug 2015

Mediawatch for 23 August 2015

Claim and counter-claim of bias cheek-by-jowl, using news to help hype radio shows; news you can use goes hyperlocal, and; examining claims screens change kids' brains.

From Mediawatch on 23 Aug 2015

Hyperlocal news you can use on the rise

Later this month, Tamahere Forum by freelance journalist Pip Stevenson is up for the 'Best Community Website' prize at the Australia New Zealand Internet Awards (The ANZIAs) along with local news sites based in Motueka and north-east Hamilton. All three are run by ex-fulltime journalists who used to work together in daily paper newsrooms. Colin Peacock talks to Pip about the forum and the prospects for 'hyperlocal' news online in New Zealand.

From Mediawatch on 23 Aug 2015

Examining claims that screens can change kids' brains

We're constantly hearing in the media that IT is changing the way we live. Fantastically useful and portable devices mean we can stay in touch with each other, and hook into the media, wherever we go and whenever we want. There's also been plenty in the media warning about the downside, especially for young people growing up in the digital age. Should we take that seriously?

From Mediawatch on 23 Aug 2015

TV3's new news show. What's the Story?

TV3's canning of Campbell Live earlier this year prompted angst about the future of serious current affairs on our screens. They successor wouldn't be "light and fluffy". So what is it? Mediawatch takes a look at its first week on air.

From Mediawatch on 16 Aug 2015

Oh no. More Sky Go no-go woe

Sky's streaming service was down for last weekend's Silver Ferns thriller. It wasn't Sky's fault, but it's far from the first time sports fans have been frustrated by its failure during top live games. With the Rugby World Cup coming up, some fans fear missing out if they're away from their TVs.

From Mediawatch on 16 Aug 2015

The response to claims of a pale, male monopoly on air

It is rare for someone prominent in the media to criticise the way they are run. Rarer still if they single out their own employers. Newstalk ZB's Rachel Smalley recently said prime time broadcasting is dominated by "wealthy white men" including her colleagues - and something should be done. What happened next? And is she right?

From Mediawatch on 16 Aug 2015

The Daily Show no-shows irk long-suffering fans

Sky TV's also been copping flak for failing to screen the much-hyped last-ever Daily Show with Jon Stewart as advertised, on the day that it aired in the US. But it's far from the first time local fans of the man dubbed 'America's satirist-in-chief' have blamed our broadcasters for failing to put him on the air here.

From Mediawatch on 16 Aug 2015

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